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Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
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Federal Reserve Board of Governors

Stress Tests and Capital Planning

Federal Reserve Board of Governors

About

The Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) is an annual exercise by the Federal Reserve to assess whether the largest bank holding companies operating in the United States have sufficient capital to continue operations throughout times of economic and financial stress and that they have robust, forward-looking capital-planning processes that account for their unique risks.

As part of this exercise, the Federal Reserve evaluates institutions' capital adequacy, internal capital adequacy assessment processes, and their individual plans to make capital distributions, such as dividend payments or stock repurchases. Dodd-Frank Act stress testing (DFAST)--a complementary exercise to CCAR--is a forward-looking component conducted by the Federal Reserve and financial companies supervised by the Federal Reserve to help assess whether institutions have sufficient capital to absorb losses and support operations during adverse economic conditions.

While DFAST is complementary to CCAR, both efforts are distinct testing exercises that rely on similar processes, data, supervisory exercises, and requirements. The Federal Reserve coordinates these processes to reduce duplicative requirements and to minimize regulatory burden.

The requirements, expectations, and activities relating to DFAST and CCAR do not apply to any banking organizations with assets of $10 billion or less. Please see the Board's clarifying statement (PDF) for more information.


Last update: June 25, 2014